Index to Chiropractic Literature
Index to Chiropractic Literature
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Tuesday, May 24, 2022
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ID 24300
  Title Evaluation of publicly available documents to trace chiropractic technique systems that advocate radiography for subluxation analysis: A proposed genealogy [review]
URL http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4245702/
Journal J Chiropr Humanit. 2014 Dec;21(1):Online access only p 1-24
Author(s)
Subject(s)
Peer Review Yes
Publication Type Review
Abstract/Notes

Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate publicly available information of chiropractic technique systems that advocate radiography for subluxation detection to identify links between chiropractic technique systems and to describe claims made of the health effects of the osseous misalignment component of the chiropractic subluxation and radiographic paradigms.

Methods: The Internet and publicly available documents were searched for information representing chiropractic technique systems that advocate radiography for subluxation detection. Key phrases including chiropractic, x-ray, radiography, and technique were identified from a Google search between April 2013 and March 2014. Phrases in Web sites and public documents were examined for any information about origins and potential links between these techniques, including the type of connection to BJ Palmer, who was the first chiropractor to advocate radiography for subluxation detection. Quotes were gathered to identify claims of health effects from osseous misalignment (subluxation) and paradigms of radiography. Techniques were grouped by region of the spine and how they could be traced back to B.J Palmer. A genealogy model and summary table of information on each technique were created. Patterns in year of origination and radiographic paradigms were noted, and percentages were calculated on elements of the techniques’ characteristics in comparison to the entire group.

Results: Twenty-three techniques were identified on the Internet: 6 full spine, 17 upper cervical, and 2 techniques generating other lineage. Most of the upper cervical techniques (14/16) traced their origins to a time when the Palmer School was teaching upper cervical technique, and all the full spine techniques (6/6) originated before or after this phase. All the technique systems’ documents attributed broad health effects to their methods. Many (21/23) of the techniques used spinal realignment on radiographs as one of their outcome measures.

Conclusion: Chiropractic technique systems in this study (ie, those that advocate for radiography for subluxation misalignment detection) seem to be closely related by descent, their claims of a variety of health effects associated with chiropractic subluxation, and their radiographic paradigms.

This abstract is reproduced with the permission of the publisher. Click on the above link for free full text.


 

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