Index to Chiropractic Literature
Index to Chiropractic Literature
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ID 22414
Title Evaluation of changes in pelvic belt tension during 2 weight-bearing functional tasks
URL http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22607781
Journal J Manipulative Physiol Ther. 2012 Jun;35(5):390-395
Author(s)
Subject(s)
Peer Review Yes
Publication Type Article
Abstract/Notes

Objective: The purposes of this study were to evaluate changes in pelvic belt tension during 2 weight-bearing functional tasks (transition from bipedal to unipedal stance [BUS] and walking) and to evaluate the reliability and the percentage variation for belt tension scores from trial to trial.

Methods: A cross-sectional repeated-measures study was conducted with 10 healthy male participants (mean age, 28.3 ± 8.8years). Participants performed 10 trials of BUS and walking while wearing a nonelastic pelvic compression belt (PCB) applied distal to the anterior superior iliac spines, with a load cell positioned in the center of the belt. The load cell was calibrated using known weights (1-10kg) to define the relationship between the applied tension and voltage change (R2 = 0.99). Load cell tension values were recorded in voltage signals and then converted to newtons of force using appropriate conversion values (0.012V = 10N). Mean and standard deviation values, intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC 3,1), and percentage standard error of measurements (% SEM) were analyzed for PCB tension recorded during the BUS and walking trials.

Results: The mean tension achieved with a PCB was found to be 41.02 (±4.23) N during BUS and 44.07 (±5.80) N during walking. The trial-to-trial reliability (ICC 3,1) was high (ICC ≥0.9), and the variation in PCB tension across 10 trials (% SEM) was 4% or less.

Conclusion: The mean tension achieved during the tasks was 44 N or less. The reliability is high, and the variation is low across the trials, which implies that a PCB could be used to produce consistent effects during repetition of the tasks (BUS and walking).

This abstract is reproduced with the permission of the publisher; full text by subscription. Click on the above link and select a publisher from PubMed's LinkOut feature.


 

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