Index to Chiropractic Literature
Index to Chiropractic Literature
My ICL     Sign In
Sunday, August 18, 2019
Index to Chiropractic LiteratureIndex to Chiropractic LiteratureIndex to Chiropractic Literature
Share:

ICL Home


For best results switch to Advanced Search.
Article Detail
Return to Search Results
ID 4834
  Title Does obesity cause low back pain?
URL https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7884330
Journal J Manipulative Physiol Ther. 1994 Nov-Dec;17(9):601-604
Author(s)
Subject(s)
Peer Review Yes
Publication Type Review
Abstract/Notes

OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study is to review the recent literature on the association between obesity and low back pain, in an effort to determine whether weight control can be considered an appropriate treatment for low back pain, and whether obesity can be considered a primary etiology of low back pain.

DATA SOURCES: We reviewed articles in English from 1970 to present on MEDLINE that listed both obesity and low back pain as key words. Because of the paucity of articles retrieved this way, we also reviewed the bibliographies of each article to draw more studies into our review. Our search generated only seven studies. A standard textbook of obesity was also utilized as a source of basic science of obesity.

CONCLUSION: Our review of these articles revealed a possible association between obesity and low back pain only in the upper quintile of obesity, and no evidence of a temporal relationship between weight change and low back pain change. The studies reviewed failed to differentiate low back pain patients by diagnosis and failed to quantify the possible presence of emotional factors in obese low back pain patients. As an incidental finding, one study documented a significant correlation between smoking history and low back pain. We concluded that there is no evidence in the current literature to support obesity that is not in the highest quintile as a cause of low back pain. We recommended that a longitudinal study be done that subclassified obese low back pain patients by mechanical and psychological diagnosis.

This abstract is reproduced with the permission of the publisher. Article only available in print.


 

   Text (Citation) Tagged (Export) Excel
 
Email To
Subject
 Message
Format
HTML Text     Excel



To use this feature you must register a personal account in My ICL. Registration is free! In My ICL you can save your ICL searches in My Searches, and you can save search results in My Collections. Be sure to use the Held Citations feature to collect citations from an entire search session. Read more search tips.

Sign Into Existing My ICL Account    |    Register A New My ICL Account
Search Tips
  • Enclose phrases in "quotation marks".  Examples: "low back pain", "evidence-based"
  • Retrieve all forms of a word with an asterisk*, also called a wildcard or truncation.  Example: chiropract* retrieves chiropractic, chiropractor, chiropractors
  • Register an account in My ICL to save search histories (My Searches) and collections of records (My Collections)
Advanced Search Tips