Index to Chiropractic Literature
Index to Chiropractic Literature
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Monday, May 23, 2022
Index to Chiropractic LiteratureIndex to Chiropractic LiteratureIndex to Chiropractic Literature
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ID 26960
  Title Educational Research in Action. Developing a standardized curriculum for teaching chiropractic technique: Qualitative analysis of participants' opinions from 4 intercollegiate conference workshops
URL https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/33822081/
Journal J Chiropr Educ. 2021 Oct;35(2):249-257
Author(s)
Subject(s)
Peer Review Yes
Publication Type Article
Abstract/Notes

Objective: This is a report of the results of 4 facilitated workshops aimed at developing a standardized chiropractic technique curriculum.

Methods: Workshops were held at research conferences during 2014, 2016, 2018, and 2019. Participants were tasked with developing recommendations for diagnostic and therapeutic procedures appropriate for chiropractic technique programs.

Results: For diagnostic procedures, there was general agreement among participants that chiropractic programs should include diagnostic imaging, postural assessment, gait analysis, palpation (static, motion, and joint play/springing), global range of motion, and evidence-based orthopedic/neurological tests. No consensus could be reached with respect to chiropractic x-ray line marking (spinography) nor heat sensing instruments, and there was only partial consensus on leg length assessment. For therapeutic procedures, all participants agreed that the following should be included: high-velocity, low amplitude spinal and extremity manipulation, adjustments assisted by hand-held instruments, drop tables, flexion-distraction tables, and pelvic blocks. There was unanimous support for teaching mobilization of the spine and peripheral joints, as well as for manual and instrument-assisted soft tissue therapies. There were some overarching issues: participants strongly preferred assessment methods known to be reliable and valid and therapeutic procedures known to be safe and effective. Where evidence was lacking, they insisted that diagnostic and therapeutic methods at minimum have face validity and biological plausibility. However, they cautioned against applying aspects of evidence-based care too rigidly.

Conclusions: Despite differing views on chiropractic terminology, philosophy, and scope of practice, participants' opinions were similar regarding diagnostic and therapeutic procedures that ought to be included in chiropractic technique programs.

Author keywords: Manipulation, Chiropractic, Methods, Education

Author affiliations: BJG: Department of Chiropractic Therapeutics, Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; RC: Departments of Technique and Research at Palmer Chiropractic College West, San Jose, California, United States; CG: University of Bridgeport College of Chiropractic, Fairfield, Connecticut, United States; CR: US Department of Veterans Affairs Nebraska, Western Iowa Health Care System, Whole Health Department, Grand Island, Nebraska, United States; CB: Southern California University of Health Sciences, Santa Monica, California, United States
Corresponding author: Brian Gleberzon—bgleberzon@cmcc.ca

This abstract is reproduced with the permission of the publisher. Click on the above link to access free full text. Online access only. Publisher record | PDF


 

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