Index to Chiropractic Literature
Index to Chiropractic Literature
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Friday, August 19, 2022
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ID 26806
  Title Changes in opioid therapy use by an interprofessional primary care team: A descriptive study of opioid prescription data
URL https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/33879351/
Journal J Manipulative Physiol Ther. 2021 Mar;44(3):186-195
Author(s)
Subject(s)
Peer Review Yes
Publication Type Article
Abstract/Notes

Objective: The purpose of this study was to describe changes in opioid-therapy prescription rates after a family medicine practice included on-site chiropractic services.

Methods: The study design was a retrospective analysis of opioid prescription data. The database included opioid prescriptions written for patients seeking care at the family medicine practice from April 2015 to September 2018. In June 2016, the practice reviewed and changed its opioid medication practices. In April 2017, the practice included on-site chiropractic services. Opiod-therapy use was defined as the average rate of opioid prescriptions over all medical providers at the practice.

Results: There was a significant decrease of 22% in the average monthly rate of opioid prescriptions after the inclusion of chiropractic services (F1,40 = 10.69; P < .05). There was a significant decrease of 32% in the prescribing rate of schedule II opioids after the inclusion of chiropractic services (F2,80 = 6.07 for the Group × Schedule interaction; P < .05). The likelihood of writing schedule II opioid prescriptions decreased by 27% after the inclusion of chiropractic services (odds ratio, 0.73; 95% confidence interval, 0.59-0.90). Changes in opioid medication practices by the medical providers included prescribing a schedule III or IV opioid rather than a schedule II opioid (F6,76 = 29.81; P < .05) and a 30% decrease in the daily doses of opioid prescriptions (odds ratio, 0.70; 95% confidence interval, 0.50-0.98).

Conclusion: This study demonstrates that there were decreases in opioid-therapy prescribing rates after a family medicine practice included on-site chiropractic services. This suggests that inclusion of chiropractic services may have had a positive effect on prescribing behaviors of medical physicians, as they may have been able to offer their patients additional nonpharmaceutical options for pain management.

Author keywords: Chiropractic; Family Practice; Analgesics, Opioid; Prescriptions

Author affilaitions: JR: Rosa Chiropractic and Physical Therapy Center, Rockville, Maryland; JRB: Research, New York Chiropractic College, Seneca Falls, New York

This abstract is reproduced with the permission of the publisher; full text is available by subscription. Click on the above link and select a publisher from PubMed's LinkOut feature.


 

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