Index to Chiropractic Literature
Index to Chiropractic Literature
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Sunday, May 16, 2021
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ID 26593
  Title Effect of posterior pelvic tilt taping on abdominal muscle thickness and lumbar lordosis in individuals with chronic low back pain and hyperlordosis: A single-group, repeated-measures trial
URL https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jcm.2020.07.001
Journal J Chiropr Med. 2020 Dec;19(4):213-221
Author(s)
Subject(s)
Peer Review Yes
Publication Type Article
Abstract/Notes

Objective: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of posterior pelvic tilt taping (PPTT) on lumbar lordosis, pain, disability, and abdominal muscle thickness in individuals with nonspecific chronic low back pain with hyperlordosis.

Methods: A prospective, single-group, repeated-measures design was conducted with 31 individuals with nonspecific chronic low back pain (16 men, 15 women) with hyperlordosis (mean ± SD = 59.3° ± 2.9°). Participants’ mean age, pain, disability, and lumbar lordosis were, respectively, 35.7 ± 9.9 years, 5.1 ± 1.3, 26.8 ± 11.5, and 59.3° ± 2.9°. The thickness of the abdominal muscles on both sides was measured in the crook lying position by ultrasound imaging. PPTT was performed on both sides. Pain intensity, functional disability, lumbar lordosis angle, and abdominal muscle thickness were measured before PPTT (W0), 1 week after PPTT (W1), and 1 week after PPTT removal (W2).

Results: Analysis revealed significant reductions in lumbar lordosis, pain, and disability, and increased abdominal muscle thickness, at W1 and W2 compared with W0 (P < .001). There were no significant differences in lumbar lordosis or abdominal muscle thickness between W1 and W2.

Conclusion: The current study showed in a small group of participants that 1 week of PPTT may improve lumbar lordosis, pain, disability, and abdominal muscle thickness in individuals with nonspecific chronic low back pain with hyperlordosis.

Author keywords: Athletic Tape; Chronic Pain; Lordosis; Muscle Thickness; Ultrasonography

Author affiliations: AB, IET, MA, HM, OR, RS: Rehabilitation Research Center, Department of Physical Therapy, School of Rehabilitation Sciences, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran; OR: Department of Public Health and Nursing, Department of Mental Health, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim, Norway

This abstract is reproduced with the permission of the publisher; full text is available by subscription.  PubMed Record | PubMed Central Record [June 1, 2021]


 

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