Index to Chiropractic Literature
Index to Chiropractic Literature
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ID 26459
  Title Age, sex, body mass index, and laterality in the foot posture of adolescents: A cross sectional study
URL https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/32891470/
Journal J Manipulative Physiol Ther. 2020 Sep;43(7):744-752
Author(s)
Subject(s)
Peer Review Yes
Publication Type Article
Abstract/Notes

Objective: To investigate the relationship between the right and left foot posture in terms of body mass index (BMI), sex, and age in adolescents aged 10 to 14.

Methods: A total of 1400 adolescents were included. For assessment, the Foot Posture Index (FPI-6) was used. Each foot was assessed and ranked as supinated, normal, or pronated by the sum of the FPI-6 criteria. Each criterion was scored on a scale of -2 to +2, with negative for supinated and positive for pronated posture. A linear mixed model with repeated measures was used for statistical analysis.

Results: Sex, BMI, and right and left foot are associated with FPI-6. The total score attributed for male sex (β = 0.29, P = .04) and the left foot (β = 0.73, P < .001) was higher (male right foot: mean ± standard deviation [SD], 3.09 ± 2.84, male left foot: 3.76 ± 2.80; female right foot: mean ± SD, 2.28 ± 2.61, female left foot: 3.45 ± 2.66; laterality for left foot: mean ± SD, 3.55 ± 2.71, laterality for right foot: mean ± SD, 2.82 ± 2.7). On the other hand, the correlation coefficient for the BMI was negative (β = -0.08, P = < .001), which means that the higher the BMI the lower the score attributed to the FPI-6.

Conclusions: The FPI-6 is positively related to the male sex and the left foot-that is, the predicted score is higher, so the feet tend to present with a tendency to pronation. Although BMI is associated with FPI-6, it was not possible to establish a relationship between high BMI and pronation of the feet.

Author keywords: Posture; Foot; Adolescent; Body Mass Index

Author affiliations: BKGdC: Department of Physical Therapy, Speech and Occupational Therapy, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil; PJP, RMA: Department of Physical Therapy, Faculty of Human Sciences and Health, Pontifícia Universidade Católica de São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil; NLJPR: Pontifícia Universidade Católica de São Paulo, São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil; APR: Department of Physical Therapy, Faculty of Medicine, University of Santo Amaro, São Paulo, Brazil; SMAJ: Department of Physical Therapy, Speech and Occupational Therapy, Musculoskeletal Evaluation Laboratory, Faculty of Medicine, University of São Paulo, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil

This abstract is reproduced with the permission of the publisher; full text is available by subscription. Click on the above link and select a publisher from PubMed's LinkOut feature.


 

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