Index to Chiropractic Literature
Index to Chiropractic Literature
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Saturday, August 13, 2022
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ID 26327
  Title The utilization of joint mobilization as part of a comprehensive program to manage carpal tunnel syndrome: A systematic review
URL https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/32861521/
Journal J Manipulative Physiol Ther. 2020 May;43(4):356-370
Author(s)
Subject(s)
Peer Review Yes
Publication Type Systematic Review
Abstract/Notes

Objective: The purpose of this review is to identify the role of joint mobilization for individuals with Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS).

Methods: A systematic search of 5 electronic databases (PubMed, CINAHL, Scopus, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and SPORTDiscus) was performed to identify eligible full-text randomized clinical trials related to the clinical question. Joint mobilization had to be included in one arm of the randomized clinical trials to be included. Two reviewers independently participated in each step of the screening process. A blinded third reviewer assisted in cases of discrepancy. The PEDro scale was used to assess quality.

Results: Ten articles were included after screening 2068 titles. In each article where joint mobilization was used, positive effects in pain, function, or additional outcomes were noted. In most cases, the intervention group integrating joint mobilization performed better than the comparison group not receiving joint techniques.

Conclusion: In the articles reviewed, joint mobilization was associated with positive clinical effects for persons with CTS. No studies used joint mobilization in isolation; therefore, results must be interpreted cautiously. This review indicates that joint mobilization might be a useful adjunctive intervention in the management of CTS.

Author keywords: Manipulation; Musculoskeletal Manipulations; Orthopedic; Pain

Author affiliations: JDS: University of Illinois Hospital and Health Sciences System, Chicago, Illinois; DJJ: Department of Health, Human Function and Rehabilitation Sciences, The George Washington University, Washington, DC; JJM: School of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Science, University of Montana, Missoula, Montana; AAP: Department of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Science, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa

This abstract is reproduced with the permission of the publisher; full text is available by subscription. Click on the above link and select a publisher from PubMed's LinkOut feature.


 

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