Index to Chiropractic Literature
Index to Chiropractic Literature
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Saturday, September 18, 2021
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ID 26216
  Title PROMIS® General Life Satisfaction scale: Construct validity in musculoskeletal pain patients
URL https://chiromt.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12998-020-00320-x
Journal Chiropr & Manual Ther. 2020 ;28(27):Online access only 7 p
Author(s)
Subject(s)
Peer Review Yes
Publication Type Article
Abstract/Notes

Background: Life satisfaction is part of subjective well-being. Measurement of life satisfaction is undertaken using self-report measures. This study aimed to evaluate the structural validity, concurrent validity, and internal structure of the PROMIS® General Life Satisfaction Scale (GLSS) in a musculoskeletal pain cohort.

Method: Consecutive new patients attending the Victoria University Osteopathy Clinic (Melbourne, Australia) were invited to complete the GLSS prior to their initial consultation. Structural validity and internal structure were explored using confirmatory factor analysis and Mokken scale analysis. Concurrent validity was evaluated against a single-item measure of life satisfaction.

Results: The PROMIS® GLSS comprised a single factor and formed an acceptable Mokken scale in this population. No differential item functioning was observed. A large positive correlation (r = 0.70) was observed between the General Life Satisfaction scale and a single-item measure of life satisfaction.

Conclusions: The PROMIS® General Life Satisfaction scale demonstrated acceptable internal structure and structural validity in a musculoskeletal pain population. Additional research is required to explore concurrent validity and other measurement properties, however initial data suggests the measure could be a feasible screen of life satisfaction for Australian osteopathic patients.

Author keywords: Item response theory — Reliability estimation —   Patient report outcome measure — Internal consistency —  Osteopathic medicine —  Osteopathy

Author affiliations:  BV: Department of Medical Education, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia; JM: College of Health & Biomedicine, Victoria University, Melbourne, Australia; KF: School of Health & Biomedicine, RMIT University, Melbourne, Australia

This abstract is reproduced with the permission of the publisher; click on the above link for free full text. PDF | PubMed Record


 

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