Index to Chiropractic Literature
Index to Chiropractic Literature
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ID 25252
  Title A path analysis of the effects of biopsychosocial factors on the onset of nonspecific low back pain in office workers
URL https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30007743
Journal J Manipulative Physiol Ther. 2018 Jun;41(5):405-412
Author(s)
Subject(s)
Peer Review Yes
Publication Type Article
Abstract/Notes

Objective: The purpose of this study was to develop a conceptual model for the association between various biopsychosocial factors and nonspecific low back pain (LBP) in a sample of office workers.

Methods: A 1-year prospective cohort study of 669 healthy office workers was conducted. At baseline, a self-administered questionnaire and standardized physical examination were employed to gather biopsychosocial data. Follow-up data were collected every month for the incidence of LBP. A regression model was built to analyze factors predicting the onset of LBP. Path analysis was performed to examine direct and indirect associations between identified risk factors and LBP.

Results: The onset of LBP was predicted by history of LBP, frequency of rest breaks, and psychological demand, measured by the Job Content Questionnaire. All 3 factors directly related to LBP; history of LBP was the strongest effector on the onset of LBP. History of LBP and frequency of rest breaks had indirect effects on LBP that were mediated through psychological demand, and frequency of rest breaks was the most influential effector on psychological demand.

Conclusions: Three risk factors were identified to predict onset LBP, including history of LBP, frequency of rest breaks, and psychological demand. Each factor had direct effects on the development of LBP. Also, history of LBP and frequency of rest breaks had indirect effects on LBP that were mediated through psychological demand.

Author keywords: Low Back Pain, Musculoskeletal Diseases, Computers, Etiology

Author affiliations: Department of Physical Therapy, Faculty of Allied Health Sciences, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand

This abstract is reproduced with the permission of the publisher; full text is available by subscription. Click on the above link and select a publisher from PubMed's LinkOut feature.


 

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