Index to Chiropractic Literature
Index to Chiropractic Literature
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ID 25201
  Title Comparison between transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation and stabilization exercises in fatigue and transversus abdominis activation in patients with lumbar disk herniation: A randomized study
URL https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29751850
Journal J Manipulative Physiol Ther. 2018 May;41(4):323-331
Author(s)
Subject(s)
Peer Review Yes
Publication Type Article
Abstract/Notes

Objective: The purpose of this study was to compare transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) and stabilization exercises in an attempt to prevent fatigue and improve muscle activation in patients with lumbar disk herniation associated with low back pain.

Methods: This study involved 29 patients (age range 25-58 years) randomized into 2 groups: the segmental stabilization group (n = 15), who received stabilization exercises on the transversus abdominis (TrA) and lumbar multifidus muscles; and the TENS group (n = 14), who received electrotherapy. Groups underwent 16 sessions, for 60 minutes, twice per week, and they were evaluated before and after intervention. Pain was measured using a visual analog scale, functional disability using the Oswestry Disability Index, muscle activation and fatigue with electromyography, and patients’ ability to contract the TrA with a pressure biofeedback unit. Analyses within and between groups were performed.

Results: The stabilization group improved lumbar multifidus fatigue (median frequency [MF] initial [P = .002], MF final [P < .001], MF slope [P = .001], and resistance time [P < .001]), ability to contract the TrA (P < .001), pain (P < .001), and functional disability (P < .001). TENS only was effective for pain (P = .012).

Conclusion: Although it relieved pain, TENS was not effective as a single treatment to prevent fatigue, increase TrA contraction, and reduce functional disability in herniated disk patients. Stabilization exercises alone improved all measured outcomes.

Author keywords: Muscle Fatigue; Abdominal Muscles; Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation; Intervertebral Disk Displacement

Author affiliations: LAVR: Campus Binacional of Oiapoque, Federal University of Amapá, Oiapoque, Amapá, Brazil; BC:Laboratory of Human Movement Studies, Department of Physical Therapy and Occupational Therapy, Institute of Health Sciences, Federal University of Pará, Belém, Pará, Brazil; FJRF, TNB, APMCCES, JC, APM: Department of Physical, Speech, and Occupational Therapy, School of Medicine, University of Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brazil; MOM: Laboratory of Human Movement Studies, Department of Physical Therapy and Occupational Therapy, Institute of Health Sciences, Federal University of Pará, Belém, Pará, Brazil; GPLA: Department of Physical Therapy, School of Medicine, Federal University of Ceará, Fortaleza, Ceará, Brazil

This abstract is reproduced with the permission of the publisher; full text is available by subscription. Click on the above link and select a publisher from PubMed's LinkOut feature.


 

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