Index to Chiropractic Literature
Index to Chiropractic Literature
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Sunday, August 25, 2019
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ID 24038
  Title Comparison of parameters characterizing lumbar lordosis in radiograph and photogrammetric examination of adults
URL http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25704220
Journal J Manipulative Physiol Ther. 2015 Mar-Apr;38(3):225-231
Author(s)
Subject(s)
Peer Review Yes
Publication Type Article
Abstract/Notes

Objective: The purpose of this study was to test validity of photogrammetry compared with radiography as a method of measuring the Cobb angle and the size of anterior-posterior spine curvatures in adults.

Methods: The study included 50 volunteers, 23 men and 27 women whose mean age was 52.6 years. The average weight of the subjects was 81.3 kg, average body height was 172.0 cm, and the average body mass index was 27.4. Based on radiologic examination, the length and depth of lumbar lordosis were determined and the size of the Cobb angle of lumbar scoliosis. After the radiologic examination, a photogrammetric test was performed for each subject with the projection moire phenomenon.

Results: The Pearson correlation found statistically significant associations concerning the length of lordosis (P < .001) and the Cobb angle (P < .001). Correlation of the depth of lordosis indicated a strong trend (P = .063).

Conclusions: This study found that the moire method of photogrammetric measurement produced similar findings to radiographic measurements in determining size of the Cobb angle and the length of lumbar lordosis.

This abstract is reproduced with the permission of the publisher; full text is available by subscription. Click on the above link and select a publisher from PubMed’s LinkOut feature.


 

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