Index to Chiropractic Literature
Index to Chiropractic Literature
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Tuesday, February 18, 2020
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ID 22465
  Title Immediate effects of the suboccipital muscle inhibition technique in craniocervical posture and greater occipital nerve mechanosensitivity in subjects with a history of orthodontia use: A randomized trial
URL http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22902193
Journal J Manipulative Physiol Ther. 2012 Jul-Aug;35(6):446-453
Author(s)
Subject(s)
Peer Review Yes
Publication Type Randomized Controlled Trial
Abstract/Notes

Objective: The purpose of this study was to measure the immediate differences in craniocervical posture and pressure pain threshold of the greater occipital (GO) nerve in asymptomatic subjects with a history of having used orthodontics, after intervention by a suboccipital muscle inhibition (SMI) technique.

Methods: This was a randomized, single-blind, clinical study with a sample of 24 subjects (21 ± 1.78 years) that were divided into an experimental group (n = 12) who underwent the SMI technique and a sham group (n = 12) who underwent a sham (placebo) intervention. The sitting and standing craniovertebral angle and the pressure pain threshold of the GO nerve in both hemispheres were measured.

Results: The between-group comparison of the sample indicated that individuals subjected to the SMI technique showed a statistically significant increase in the craniovertebral angle in both the sitting (P < .001, F1,22 = 102.09, R2 = 0.82) and the standing (P < .001, F1,22 = 21.42, R2 = 0.56) positions and in the GO nerve pressure pain threshold in the nondominant hemisphere (P = .014, F1,22 = 7.06, R2 = 0.24). There were no statistically significant differences observed for the GO nerve mechanosensitivity in the dominant side (P = .202).

Conclusion: Suboccipital muscle inhibition technique immediately improved the position of the head with the subject seated and standing, the clinical effect size being large in the former case. It also immediately decreased the mechanosensitivity of the GO nerve in the nondominant hemisphere, although the effect size was small.

This abstract is reproduced with the permission of the publisher; full text by subscription. Click on the above link and select a publisher from PubMed's LinkOut feature.


 

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