Index to Chiropractic Literature
Index to Chiropractic Literature
My ICL     Sign In
Wednesday, September 23, 2020
Index to Chiropractic LiteratureIndex to Chiropractic LiteratureIndex to Chiropractic Literature
Share:

ICL Home


For best results switch to Advanced Search.
Article Detail
Return to Search Results
ID 22203
  Title The influence of patient attitude toward massage on pressure pain sensitivity and immune system after application of myofascial release in breast cancer survivors: A randomized, controlled crossover study
URL http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22018755
Journal J Manipulative Physiol Ther. 2012 Feb;35(2):94-100
Author(s)
Subject(s)
Peer Review Yes
Publication Type Randomized Controlled Trial
Abstract/Notes

Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of patient's attitudes toward massage on pressure pain sensitivity and the immune effects of myofascial release in breast cancer survivors (BCS).

Methods: Twenty BCS participated. They presented to the laboratory at the same time of the day on 2 occasions separated by 2 weeks. At each session, they received either a myofascial release technique or control (special attention) intervention. Salivary flow rate, cortisol and immunoglobulin A (IgA) concentrations, and α-amylase activity were obtained before and immediately after intervention from saliva samples. Pressure pain thresholds (PPT) over the cervical spine and temporalis muscle were assessed bilaterally. The attitude toward massage (ATOM) scale was collected before the first session in all BCS.

Results: The analysis of covariance revealed a significant intervention × time interaction for salivary flow rate (P = .010), but not α-amylase (P = .111), IgA (P = .655), and cortisol (P = .363) in favor of the experimental group: BCS exhibited an increase of salivary flow rate after myofascial release intervention. When the ATOM scale was included in the analysis, significant influence on IgA (P = .001) was found: BCS with positive attitude had a significant increase in IgA (P > .05). The analysis of covariance did not find a significant intervention × time interaction for PPT over the cervical spine or temporalis muscle, with no effect of ATOM scales for PPT (P > .05).

Conclusion: The current study suggests that myofascial release may lead to an immediate increase in salivary flow rate in BCS with cancer-related fatigue. We also found that the effect of myofascial release on immune function was modulated by a positive patient's attitude toward massage.

This abstract is reproduced with the permission of the publisher; full text by subscription. Click on the above link and select a publisher from PubMed's LinkOut feature.


   Text (Citation) Tagged (Export) Excel
 
Email To
Subject
 Message
Format
HTML Text     Excel



To use this feature you must register a personal account in My ICL. Registration is free! In My ICL you can save your ICL searches in My Searches, and you can save search results in My Collections. Be sure to use the Held Citations feature to collect citations from an entire search session. Read more search tips.

Sign Into Existing My ICL Account    |    Register A New My ICL Account
Search Tips
  • Enclose phrases in "quotation marks".  Examples: "low back pain", "evidence-based"
  • Retrieve all forms of a word with an asterisk*, also called a wildcard or truncation.  Example: chiropract* retrieves chiropractic, chiropractor, chiropractors
  • Register an account in My ICL to save search histories (My Searches) and collections of records (My Collections)
Advanced Search Tips