Index to Chiropractic Literature
Index to Chiropractic Literature
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ID 21735
  Title Feasibility of the STarT back screening tool in chiropractic clinics: A cross-sectional study of patients with low back pain
URL http://chiromt.com/content/19/1/10/abstract
Journal Chiropr & Manual Ther. 2011 ;19(10):Online access only 24 p
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Peer Review Yes
Publication Type Article
Abstract/Notes The STarT back screening tool (SBT) allocates low back pain (LBP) patients into three risk groups and is intended to assist clinicians in their decisions about choice of treatment. The tool consists of domains from larger questionnaires that previously have been shown to be predictive of non-recovery from LBP. This study was performed to describe the distribution of depression, fear avoidance and catastrophising in relation to the SBT risk groups. A total of 475 primary care patients were included from 19 chiropractic clinics. They completed the SBT, the Major Depression Inventory (MDI), the Fear Avoidance Beliefs Questionnaire (FABQ), and the Coping Strategies Questionnaire. Associations between the continuous scores of the psychological questionnaires and the SBT were tested by means of linear regression, and the diagnostic performance of the SBT in relation to the other questionnaires was described in terms of sensitivity, specificity and likelihood ratios. In this cohort 59 % were in the SBT low risk, 29 % in the medium risk and 11 % in high risk group. The SBT risk groups were positively associated with all of the psychological questionnaires. The SBT high risk group had positive likelihood ratios for having a risk profile on the psychological scales ranging from 3.8 (95 % CI 2.3 - 6.3) for the MDI to 7.6 (95 % CI 4.9 - 11.7) for the FABQ. The SBT questionnaire was feasible to use in chiropractic practice and risk groups were related to the presence of well-established psychological prognostic factors. If the tool proves to predict prognosis in future studies, it would be a relevant alternative in clinical practice to other more comprehensive questionnaires.

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