Index to Chiropractic Literature
Index to Chiropractic Literature
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ID 21299
  Title The attrition rate of licensed chiropractors in California: An exploratory ecological investigation of time-trend data
URL http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2925831
Journal Chiropr & Osteopat. 2010 ;18(24):Online access only 38 p
Author(s)
Subject(s)
Peer Review Yes
Publication Type Article
Abstract/Notes Background: The authors hypothesized the attrition rate of licensed chiropractors in California has gradually increased over the past several decades. "Attrition" as determined for this study is defined as a loss of legal authority to practice chiropractic for any reason during the first 10 years after the license was issued. The percentage of license attrition after 10 years was determined for each group of graduates licensed in California each year between 1970 and 1998. The cost of tuition, the increase in the supply of licensed chiropractors and the ratio of licensed chiropractors to California residents were examined as possible influences on the rate of license attrition.

Methods: The attrition rate was determined by a retrospective analysis of license status data obtained from the California Department of Consumer Affairs. Other variables were determined from US Bureau of Census data, survey data from the American Chiropractic Association and catalogs from a US chiropractic college.

Results: The 10-year attrition rate rose from 10% for those graduates licensed in 1970 to a peak of 27.8% in 1991. The 10-year attrition rate has since remained between 20-25% for the doctors licensed between 1992-1998.

Conclusions: Available evidence supports the hypothesis that the attrition rate for licensed chiropractors in the first 10 years of practice has risen in the past several decades.

This abstract is reproduced with the permission of the publisher; click on the above link for free full text.


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