Index to Chiropractic Literature
Index to Chiropractic Literature
My ICL     Sign In
Friday, October 15, 2021
Index to Chiropractic LiteratureIndex to Chiropractic LiteratureIndex to Chiropractic Literature
Share:


For best results switch to Advanced Search.
Article Detail
Return to Search Results
ID 20976
  Title Effects of high-velocity, low-amplitude spinal manipulation on strength and the basal tonus of female pelvic floor muscles
URL http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20170776
Journal J Manipulative Physiol Ther. 2010 Feb;33(2):109-116
Author(s)
Subject(s)
Peer Review Yes
Publication Type Article
Abstract/Notes Objective: Spinal manipulation with high-velocity and low-amplitude (HVLA) manipulation is frequently used for the treatment of lumbopelvic pain; however, the effect on the pelvic floor has been poorly studied in the past. The objective of this study was to quantify the intravaginal pressure (IVP) and the basal perineal tonus (BPT), measured in terms of pressure, before and after the HVLA manipulation in patients without neuromuscular and skeletal dysfunctions.

Methods: In this experimental, noncontrolled, nonrandomized study, IVP was obtained through a perineometer introduced into the volunteers' vagina while in dorsal horizontal decubitus. Forty young, healthy university volunteer women with no history of vaginal delivery participated. All voluntary contractions of the perineal muscles were measured in 3 different ways: phasic perineal contraction (PPC), tonic perineal contraction, and perineal contraction associated to accessory muscles. New pressure measurements were obtained immediately after the HVLA manipulation on the volunteers' sacrum. The pressures were registered and transcribed directly to a personal computer with specific software.

Results: The average IVPs obtained in millimeters of mercury before and after the HVLA manipulation were 56.01 (±25.54) and 64.65 (±25.63) for PPC, 445.90 (±186.84) and 483.14 (±175.29) for tonic perineal contraction, and 65.62 (±26.56) and 69.37 (±25.26) for perineal contraction associated to accessory muscles, respectively. There was significant statistical variation only for PPC (P = .0020) values. The BPT increased regardless of the type of contraction (P < .05).

Conclusion: High-velocity and low-amplitude manipulation of the sacrum was associated with an increase of PPC and of BPT in women who had no associated osteoarticular diseases. These preliminary discoveries could be helpful in the future study of the treatment of women with perineal hypotony.

This abstract is reproduced with the permission of the publisher; full text by subscription. Click on the above link and select a publisher from PubMed's LinkOut feature.


   Text (Citation) Tagged (Export) Excel
 
Email To
Subject
 Message
Format
HTML Text     Excel



To use this feature you must register a personal account in My ICL. Registration is free! In My ICL you can save your ICL searches in My Searches, and you can save search results in My Collections. Be sure to use the Held Citations feature to collect citations from an entire search session. Read more search tips.

Sign Into Existing My ICL Account    |    Register A New My ICL Account
Search Tips
  • Enclose phrases in "quotation marks".  Examples: "low back pain", "evidence-based"
  • Retrieve all forms of a word with an asterisk*, also called a wildcard or truncation.  Example: chiropract* retrieves chiropractic, chiropractor, chiropractors
  • Register an account in My ICL to save search histories (My Searches) and collections of records (My Collections)
Advanced Search Tips