Index to Chiropractic Literature
Index to Chiropractic Literature
My ICL     Sign In
Sunday, June 16, 2019
Index to Chiropractic LiteratureIndex to Chiropractic LiteratureIndex to Chiropractic Literature
Share:

ICL Home


For best results switch to Advanced Search.
Article Detail
Return to Search Results
ID 20708
Title The effects of chiropractic on a child with transient motor tics using Gonstead & Toggle techniques [case report]
URL https://www.vertebralsubluxationresearch.com/2009/06/29/the-effects-of-chiropractic-on-a-child-with-transient-motor-tics-using-gonstead-toggle-techniques/
Journal J Pediatr Matern & Fam Health - Chiropr. 2009 Spring;2009(2):Online access 9 p
Author(s)
Subject(s)
Peer Review Yes
Publication Type Case Report
Abstract/Notes

Objective: To describe the chiropractic care of a patient with medically diagnosed “transient motor tic disorder.”

Clinical Features: The patient was a 6-yr-old girl presenting for chiropractic care with a medical diagnosis of “transient motor tic disorder” of 6 months duration. History examination revealed trauma to the spine. The patient presented with repetitive eye blinking and rolling of the eyes in multiple directions every 3 to 5 seconds, bilateral shoulder shrugging and arching back of the head and neck with an open mouth. Optometrist and ophthalmologist examinations were unremarkable, including contrast MRI of the brain. Chiropractic examination revealed left head tilt, high left shoulder, and high right ilium. Static and motion palpation of the patient's spine revealed subluxation of the atlas, the C7 and T4 vertebral bodies and the right sacroiliac joint.

Interventions and Outcomes: The patient was cared for with site-specific chiropractic adjustments a là Gonstead Technique to sites of spinal subluxations along with Toggle Recoil for the atlas. Following 6 visits over a period of 5 weeks, the patient's tic disorder resolved. The patient returned for care 2½ months later with complaints of eye blinking and rolling following an ice-skating fall. The patient was cared for as previously described with resolution of her tic disorder.

Conclusion: This case report provides evidence-based support that children with motor tic disorders may benefit from chiropractic care vis-à-vis the detection and removal of spinal subluxation.

Author Keywords: Chiropractic, motor tic disorder, vertebral subluxation, spinal manipulative therapy, adjustment, Gonstead Technique

This abstract is reproduced with the permission of the publisher; full text by subscription.


      Text (Citation) Tagged (Export) Excel
 
Email To
Subject
 Message
Format
HTML Text     Excel



Search Tips
  • Enclose phrases in "quotation marks".  Examples: "low back pain", "evidence-based"
  • Retrieve all forms of a word with an asterisk*, also called a wildcard or truncation.  Example: chiropract* retrieves chiropractic, chiropractor, chiropractors
  • Register an account in My ICL to save search histories (My Searches) and collections of records (My Collections)
Advanced Search Tips