Index to Chiropractic Literature
Index to Chiropractic Literature
My ICL     Sign In
Sunday, June 16, 2019
Index to Chiropractic LiteratureIndex to Chiropractic LiteratureIndex to Chiropractic Literature
Share:

ICL Home


For best results switch to Advanced Search.
Article Detail
Return to Search Results
ID 20600
Title RETRACTION: Low back pain status in elite and semi-elite Australian football codes: A cross-sectional survey of football (soccer), Australian rules, rugby league, rugby union and non-athletic controls
URL http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2474/10/38
Journal BMC Musculoskel Disord. 2009 ;10(38):Online access only 9 p.
Author(s)
Subject(s)
Peer Review Yes
Publication Type Article
Abstract/Notes RETRACTION: The journal has been informed by the authors' institution that, contrary to the statement in this article, the Macquarie University Human Ethics Committee did not receive an application for ethics approval for this study. As the study was conducted without institutional ethics committee oversight, this article has been retracted. References 1. Low back pain status in elite and semi-elite Australian football codes: a cross-sectional survey of football (soccer), Australian-Rules, rugby league, rugby union and non-athletic controls: Wayne Hoskins, Henry Pollard, Chris Daff, Andrew Odell, Peter Garbutt, Andrew McHardy, Kate Hardy and George Dragasevic. BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders 2009, 10:38 [Retraction published July 11, 2011]

BACKGROUND: Our understanding of the effects of football code participation on low back pain (LBP) is limited. It is unclear whether LBP is more prevalent in athletic populations or differs between levels of competition. Thus it was the aim of this study to document and compare the prevalence, intensity, quality and frequency of LBP between elite and semi-elite male Australian football code participants and a non-athletic group.

METHODS: A cross-sectional survey of elite and semi-elite male Australian football code participants and a non-athletic group was performed. Participants completed a self-reported questionnaire incorporating the Quadruple Visual Analogue Scale (QVAS) and McGill Pain Questionnaire (short form) (MPQ-SF), along with additional questions adapted from an Australian epidemiological study. Respondents were 271 elite players (mean age 23.3, range 17-39), 360 semi-elite players (mean age 23.8, range 16-46) and 148 non-athletic controls (mean age 23.9, range 18-39).

RESULTS: Groups were matched for age (p = 0.42) and experienced the same age of first onset LBP (p = 0.40). A significant linear increase in LBP from the non-athletic group, to the semi-elite and elite groups for the QVAS and the MPQ-SF was evident (p < 0.001). Elite subjects were more likely to experience more frequent (daily or weekly OR 1.77, 95% CI 1.29-2.42) and severe LBP (discomforting and greater OR 1.75, 95% CI 1.29-2.38).

CONCLUSION: Foolers in Australia have significantly more severe and frequent LBP than a non-athletic group and this escalates with level of competition.

This abstract is reproduced with the permission of the publisher. Click on the above link for free full text. PubMed Record


      Text (Citation) Tagged (Export) Excel
 
Email To
Subject
 Message
Format
HTML Text     Excel



Search Tips
  • Enclose phrases in "quotation marks".  Examples: "low back pain", "evidence-based"
  • Retrieve all forms of a word with an asterisk*, also called a wildcard or truncation.  Example: chiropract* retrieves chiropractic, chiropractor, chiropractors
  • Register an account in My ICL to save search histories (My Searches) and collections of records (My Collections)
Advanced Search Tips