Index to Chiropractic Literature
Index to Chiropractic Literature
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Wednesday, December 2, 2020
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ID 20206
  Title Shoulder tip pain after laparoscopic surgery analgesia by collateral meridian acupressure (shiatsu) therapy: A report of 2 cases [case report]
URL http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Citation&list_uids=18722205
Journal J Manipulative Physiol Ther. 2008 Jul-Aug;31(6):484-488
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Subject(s)
Peer Review Yes
Publication Type Case Report
Abstract/Notes OBJECTIVES: This article describes 2 cases of collateral meridian acupressure (shiatsu) therapy (CMAT) for treatment of shoulder tip pain after laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC). Both cases showed marked pain relief with reduction of skin temperature (1 degrees C) of the affected shoulder after CMAT.

CLINICAL FEATURES: A 32- and a 53-year-old female presented with right shoulder tip pain after LC surgery. The repeated dose of intravenous ketorolac 30 mg and meperidine 50 mg did not improve the pain. Because of persistent pain and episodes of nausea and vomiting after intravenous nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and opioid medications, patients refused to take more analgesics, and we were consulted for pain management.

INTERVENTION AND OUTCOME: After informed written consent obtained, CMAT was performed using acupoints located on the contralateral (left) kidney meridian to treat affected (right) shoulder pain. Postoperatively, patients' pain intensity was measured using a numeric pain scale. The infrared thermography of shoulder tip was obtained before and after the CMAT. Both patients reported immediate pain relief after the CMAT, with pain scores decreased from 5 to 1 of 10 and 5 to 0 of 10, respectively. Moreover, the local skin temperature of affected shoulders were significantly decreased in both patients after the CMAT. Similarly, the temperature difference between patients' affected and nonpainful shoulders were also significant after the CMAT.

ONCLUSION: The results of these 2 cases suggest that the CMAT may be effective in reducing patients' post-LC shoulder tip pain without medication. An associated reduction of skin temperature of the painful shoulder with CMAT warrants further investigation.

This abstract is reproduced with the permission of the publisher; full text by subscription.


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