Index to Chiropractic Literature
Index to Chiropractic Literature
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ID 18826
  Title Comparative study of hands-on therapy with active exercises vs education with active exercises for the management of upper back pain
URL http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Citation&list_uids=16584949
Journal J Manipulative Physiol Ther. 2006 Mar-Apr;29(3):228-235
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Subject(s)
Peer Review Yes
Publication Type Article
Abstract/Notes OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to compare hands-on therapy, including heat, massage, and active exercises with postural education that emphasized increased self-efficacy and postural self-awareness along with education about the physiology of the disorder, and prescribed daily active exercises.

SUBJECTS: Twenty-four randomly selected women, 12 custodians and 12 students, with neck and shoulder pain and stiffness.

METHODS: All subjects received a medical examination and x-ray before the study to rule out any pre-existing neurologic deficits and an evaluation that included history taking and self-reporting of pain according to a numeric pain scale. Student participants received education and exercise instructions to be continued daily. The custodial workers received once-per-week hands-on treatment.

RESULTS: Data were compared using a nonparametric analysis (Wilcoxon signed rank test) and showed evidence of statistically significant reductions in neck, shoulder, and back stiffness and shoulder muscle tension for most of the study subjects.

CONCLUSION: Treatment of repetitive stress injuries that combines maintenance of daily active exercises prescribed and modeled by a professional therapist, which emphasize postural awareness to correct poor posture and provide a basic physiological understanding of the disorder, is as crucial to reducing upper back and neck pain and stiffness as hands-on therapy with active exercise provided in a clinical setting.

Click on the above link for the PubMed record for this article; full text by subscription. This abstract is reproduced here with the permission of the publisher. Journal Record

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