Index to Chiropractic Literature
Index to Chiropractic Literature
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Tuesday, February 18, 2020
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ID 18533
  Title Manual therapy for patients with stable angina pectoris: a nonrandomized open prospective
URL http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Citation&list_uids=16326234
Journal J Manipulative Physiol Ther. 2005 Nov-Dec;28(9):654-661
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Peer Review Yes
Publication Type Article
Abstract/Notes OBJECTIVE: To examine if participants with chest pain originating from the spine would benefit from manual therapy.

METHODS: A nonrandomized, open, prospective trial was performed at a tertiary hospital. Patients who were referred for coronary angiography because of known or suspected stable angina pectoris were invited to participate in this study. A total of 275 took part, 50 were diagnosed as cervicothoracic angina (CTA)-positive (chest pain from the cervicothoracic spine) and 225 as CTA-negative. The intervention performed was manual therapy according to chiropractic standards. Patient self reported questionnaires at baseline and 4-week follow-up, including pain measured with an 11-point box scale, Short Form 36 (quality of life), and perceived improvement.

RESULTS: Approximately 75% of CTA-positive patients reported improvement of pain and of general health after treatment, compared with 22% to 25% of CTA-negative patients (P < .0001). Pain intensity decreased in both groups with consistently larger decreases for all measures of pain among CTA-positive patients. Short Form 36 scores increased in the CTA-positive group in 5 of 8 scales and remained unchanged in the CTA-negative group.

CONCLUSION: This study suggested that patients with known or suspected angina pectoris and a diagnosis of CTA may benefit from chiropractic manual therapy. Methodologically, sound randomized clinical trials are needed to corroborate our results.

Click on the above link for the PubMed record for this article; full text by subscription. The abstract is reproduced here with the permission of the publisher.
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