Index to Chiropractic Literature
Index to Chiropractic Literature
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ID 18186
  Title Anatomic and functional leg-length inequality: A review and recommendation for clinical decision-making. Part II, the functional or unloaded leg-length asymmetry
URL http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1198238/
Journal Chiropr & Osteopat. 2005 ;13(1):Online access only 17 p
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Peer Review Yes
Publication Type Article
Abstract/Notes BACKGROUND: Part II of this review examines the functional "short leg" or unloaded leg length alignment asymmetry, including the relationship between an anatomic and functional leg-length inequality. Based on the reviewed evidence, an outline for clinical decision making regarding functional and anatomic leg-length inequality will be provided.

METHODS: Online databases: Medline, CINAHL and Mantis. Plus library searches for the time frame of 1970-2005 were done using the term "leg-length inequality".

RESULTS AND DISCUSSION: The evidence suggests that an unloaded leg-length asymmetry is a different phenomenon than an anatomic leg-length inequality, and may be due to suprapelvic muscle hypertonicity. Anatomic leg-length inequality and unloaded functional or leg-length alignment asymmetry may interact in a loaded (standing) posture, but not in an unloaded (prone/supine) posture.

CONCLUSION: The unloaded, functional leg-length alignment asymmetry is a likely phenomenon, although more research regarding reliability of the measurement procedure and validity relative to spinal dysfunction is needed. Functional leg-length alignment asymmetry should be eliminated before any necessary treatment of anatomic LLI.

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