Index to Chiropractic Literature
Index to Chiropractic Literature
My ICL     Sign In
Thursday, December 3, 2020
Index to Chiropractic LiteratureIndex to Chiropractic LiteratureIndex to Chiropractic Literature
Share:


For best results switch to Advanced Search.
Article Detail
Return to Search Results
ID 18163
  Title A review of compressive ulnar neuropathy at the elbow
URL http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=15965409
Journal J Manipulative Physiol Ther. 2005 Jun;28(5):Online access only 18 p
Author(s)
Subject(s)
Peer Review Yes
Publication Type Article
Abstract/Notes OBJECTIVE: To review the anatomy, etiology, and symptoms associated with compressive ulnar neuropathy at the elbow and to discuss the diagnosis and treatment of this condition.

DATA SOURCE: The following were searched for information relevant to cubital tunnel syndrome: MEDLINE, WorldCat, and Index to Chiropractic Literature.

RESULTS: Cubital tunnel syndrome is the second most common nerve compression syndrome of the upper extremity. Clinical features of this syndrome are described along with electrodiagnostic techniques that can be used to provide evidence concerning the probable location, character, and severity of the lesion affecting the ulnar nerve. Conservative treatment of cubital tunnel syndrome is recommended for patients with intermittent symptoms and without changes in cutaneous sensation or muscle atrophy.

CONCLUSION: A definitive diagnosis can best be made using clinical tests along with nerve conduction studies and electromyography, conservative treatment can be effective in treating this neuropathy in mild cases; in moderate or severe cases, surgery may be necessary.

This abstract is reproduced with the permission of the publisher. Click on the above link for the PubMed record for this article. Click here for free full text.

   Text (Citation) Tagged (Export) Excel
 
Email To
Subject
 Message
Format
HTML Text     Excel



To use this feature you must register a personal account in My ICL. Registration is free! In My ICL you can save your ICL searches in My Searches, and you can save search results in My Collections. Be sure to use the Held Citations feature to collect citations from an entire search session. Read more search tips.

Sign Into Existing My ICL Account    |    Register A New My ICL Account
Search Tips
  • Enclose phrases in "quotation marks".  Examples: "low back pain", "evidence-based"
  • Retrieve all forms of a word with an asterisk*, also called a wildcard or truncation.  Example: chiropract* retrieves chiropractic, chiropractor, chiropractors
  • Register an account in My ICL to save search histories (My Searches) and collections of records (My Collections)
Advanced Search Tips