Index to Chiropractic Literature
Index to Chiropractic Literature
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Sunday, May 16, 2021
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ID 16665
  Title Connective tissue: Vascular and hematological (blood) support
URL http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/picrender.fcgi?artid=2646954&blobtype=pdf
Journal J Chiropr Med. 2003 Mar;2(1):25-36
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Peer Review Yes
Publication Type Article
Abstract/Notes Connective Tissue (CT) is a ubiquitous component of all major tissues and structures of the body (50% of all body protein is CT), including that of the blood, vascular, muscle, tendon, ligament, fascia, bone, joint, IVD's (intervertebral discs) and skin. Because of its ubiquitous nature, CT is an often overlooked component of any essential nutritional program that may address the structure, and/or function of these tissues. The central role of CT in the health of a virtually all cells, tissues, organs, and organ systems, is discussed. General nutritional CT support strategies, as well as specific CT support strategies that focus on blood, vascular, structural system (eg, muscles, tendons, ligaments, fascia, bone, and joints), integument (skin) and inflammatory and immune mediation will be discussed here and will deal with connective tissue dynamics and dysfunction. An overview of the current scientific understanding and possible options for naturally enhancing the structure and function of CT through the application of these concepts will be discussed in this article, with specific attention on the vascular and hematological systems.

This abstract is reproduced with the permission of the publisher; click on the above link for free full text.


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