Index to Chiropractic Literature
Index to Chiropractic Literature
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ID 16506
  Title The forces applied by female and male chiropractors during thoracic spinal manipulation
URL http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Citation&list_uids=14739874
Journal J Manipulative Physiol Ther. 2004 Jan;27(1):49-56
Author(s)
Subject(s)
Peer Review Yes
Publication Type Article
Abstract/Notes BACKGROUND: On average, women weigh less, have a smaller frame, and are less muscular than men. Since the peak thrust force applied during spinal manipulative treatments can be quite high and must be reached in a very short period of time, one might question the physical ability of women to generate such high forces.

OBJECTIVE: To study the forces generated by male and female chiropractors as they deliver spinal manipulation to the thoracic spine.

METHODS: Fourteen male and 14 female experience-matched chiropractors participated in this study. They each manipulated 1 of 9 asymptomatic male adult subjects of similar height and weight. The clinicians were asked to manipulate a transverse process in the vicinity of T4 and T9. Any technique could be used as long as the treatment thrust was in a posterior to anterior direction and the hand contact fit onto the sensor pad (area = 100 cm2).

RESULTS: There were no significant differences (P<.05) between male and female chiropractors for any measurements in the upper thoracic area. For the lower thoracic manipulations, the preload forces for the male chiropractors were significantly greater (P<.05) than those for the female chiropractors. The remaining variables were the same between the 2 groups.

CONCLUSIONS: Female chiropractors produce, from a mechanical point of view, similar manual treatments as their male colleagues.

Click on the above link for the PubMed record for this article; full text by subscription. This abstract is reproduced here with the permission of the publisher.

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