Index to Chiropractic Literature
Index to Chiropractic Literature
My ICL     Sign In
Friday, April 10, 2020
Index to Chiropractic LiteratureIndex to Chiropractic LiteratureIndex to Chiropractic Literature
Share:

ICL Home


For best results switch to Advanced Search.
Article Detail
Return to Search Results
ID 16294
  Title Lateral cervical curve changes in patients receiving chiropractic care after a motor vehicle collision: a retrospective case series
URL http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=12902963
Journal J Manipulative Physiol Ther. 2003 Jul-Aug;26(6):352-355
Author(s)
Subject(s)
Peer Review Yes
Publication Type Case Report
Abstract/Notes OBJECTIVE: To examine radiological changes of the lateral cervical curve in patients who received chiropractic care after motor vehicle collisions.

DESIGN: A retrospective case series. Thirteen patients who had received chiropractic care after motor vehicle collisions were selected from a northeastern Washington chiropractic office. Patients had a lateral cervical radiograph taken prior to the initiation of chiropractic treatment and a comparative lateral cervical radiograph subsequent to a period of care. Cases were included if they met the previously stated criteria and if the radiographs were of sufficient quality to determine the lateral cervical curve from C2-C7.

RESULTS: Adjustments rendered using an Activator Adjusting Instrument. Eleven of the subjects were also instructed to perform stretching exercises. Compared to the initial lateral cervical radiograph, the comparative radiographs demonstrated a mean increase in cervical lordosis between C2 and C7 of 6.4 degrees (SD = 8.2). The standard error estimate of the population was 2.3 degrees, with a 95% confidence interval of 1.4 degrees to 11.4 degrees.

CONCLUSION: There was a mean increase in the cervical lordosis of 6.4 degrees (SD = 8.2). The standard error estimate of the population was 2.3 degrees, with a 95% confidence interval of 1.4 degrees to 11.4 degrees. We were not able to determine the individual effects of adjustment, stretching, and natural progression of the condition. The results suggest that further study of this phenomenon should be undertaken.

Click on the above link for the PubMed record for this letter; full text by subscription.

   Text (Citation) Tagged (Export) Excel
 
Email To
Subject
 Message
Format
HTML Text     Excel



To use this feature you must register a personal account in My ICL. Registration is free! In My ICL you can save your ICL searches in My Searches, and you can save search results in My Collections. Be sure to use the Held Citations feature to collect citations from an entire search session. Read more search tips.

Sign Into Existing My ICL Account    |    Register A New My ICL Account
Search Tips
  • Enclose phrases in "quotation marks".  Examples: "low back pain", "evidence-based"
  • Retrieve all forms of a word with an asterisk*, also called a wildcard or truncation.  Example: chiropract* retrieves chiropractic, chiropractor, chiropractors
  • Register an account in My ICL to save search histories (My Searches) and collections of records (My Collections)
Advanced Search Tips