Index to Chiropractic Literature
Index to Chiropractic Literature
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Thursday, July 29, 2021
Index to Chiropractic LiteratureIndex to Chiropractic LiteratureIndex to Chiropractic Literature
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ID 16246
  Title The stubborn hip: idiopathic avascular necrosis of the hip
URL http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=12584503
Journal J Manipulative Physiol Ther. 2003 Feb;26(2):Online access only e11 (4 p)
Author(s)
Subject(s)
Peer Review Yes
Publication Type Case Report
Abstract/Notes

OBJECTIVE: To highlight the unusually indolent course of avascular necrosis in this patient, the risk factors of which chiropractors should be aware, the necessity of and means to an early diagnosis, the limitations of plain film radiographs, as well as the current medical treatments.

CLINICAL FEATURES: A 27-year-old male professional soccer player had a tight and achy right hip for approximately 6 years, a condition that increased with physical activity. His active range of motion was limited by 25% in extension and abduction, and all resisted ranges of motion produced pain. After an equivocal radiograph and bone scan, magnetic resonance imaging revealed a subchondral defect located on the superior aspect of the right femoral head, consistent with avascular necrosis of the femoral head.

Intervention and Outcome: Presurgical management included Cybex testing, massage, myofascial release, interferential current, muscle strengthening, and muscle balancing exercises 3-5 times per week for 5 months. The patient underwent a curette procedure. Six weeks later, he returned to the chiropractic office for postsurgical rehabilitation, in which he is still involved today. He has made progress with respect to flexibility, strength, and muscle coordination.

CONCLUSIONS: Idiopathic avascular necrosis of the hip is a clinical entity characterized by pain in the hip made worse with activity and at night, which may radiate to the groin, back, or thigh. Often, physical exam and radiographic findings are equivocal, at which point advanced imaging such as magnetic resonance imaging should be ordered to identify the disease in its earliest stages.

Click on the above link for the PubMed record for this letter; full text by subscription.

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